Vote

Countdown to Election Day!

Vote

by Lashon Amado, OYUnited | November 1, 2018

The 2018 midterm election takes place on November 6, 2018 –  less than a week away.  Our country needs you to SHOW UP! to the polls on that day and have your voice heard. All 435 seats in the federal government’s House of Representatives and 35 of the 100 seats in the Senate will be up for election! In addition, there are state, local, and tribal elections happening. There is a lot at stake! There is a lot of opportunity to elect leaders who truly represent our communities and our issues.

LET US BE SEEN AND HEARD!

One thing is for sure: if young people from low-income communities do NOT show up at the polls, the elected officials will NOT take our issues seriously.  LET US BE SEEN AND HEARD!   We want to increase opportunity and decrease poverty in America, throughout urban, rural, and tribal communities.  We want respect and inclusion for Black, White, Latinx, Native American, Asian, and mixed race people, and for people of all ethnicities, gender identities and religious faiths.   We want decent pay, affordable housing, good education, and safety for all.

We have seen the power of the vote in states like Massachusetts, where voters elected four women of color in the primaries to become their parties’ candidates for federal, state, and local offices. One of the candidates, Ayanna Pressley, an African-American candidate for Congress, made history by bringing out four times the number of voters who came out in the last mid-term primary.  As a result, she will become the first African American woman Congresswoman from Massachusetts, because she has no opponent on November 6.

There are also 157 ballot measures to be voted on in 34 states. The ballot measures cover a wide-range of important issues like redistricting reform, voting rights, affordable housing, minimum wage, marijuana, health care, and taxes.

Young voters are expected to turn out at record-breaking levels in the midterm elections! Make sure you take part in making history and encourage your family and peers to do the same. We need all hands on deck.

So get ready: Mark your calendars, arrange your rides, work out your work schedules, talk to your friends and family, research your candidates, and find your babysitters. Actually – bring the kids with you! It is important that they witness their parents stand up and use their power.

Here are some resources to help.

Tools to Be an Informed Voter

  • BallotReady: If you are unsure of who to vote for or undecided on any of the referendums/ballot measures, our partners at  BallotReady offer a digital voter guide and a “make a plan to vote” tool. BallotReady also has background information for every candidate and referendum on your personal ballot, allows you to compare candidates based on their stances on issues, biography, and endorsements and save your choices as you go. All you have to do is visit their website and enter your zip code.
  • Use Rock the Vote to Find Your Polling Location: If you are unsure of where to vote, you may visit the website of our partners at Rock the Vote to find your polling location . All you have to do is enter your home address. You can also visit their Know You Rights Tool to learn more about your state’s law on ID requirements, voting rights for returning citizens, pre-registration, and more.
  • Use Vote.org to see if you can take advantage of early voting: 37 states, including the District of Columbia, now let citizens vote ahead of Election Day. Early voting makes it easier to vote. You can avoid long lines on Election Day and pick a time that’s more convenient for you. Vote.org will let you know if your state allows early voting (click here to go directly to that feature).

Get Inspired!

Still wondering if your vote matters? Click here to watch some inspiring videos from some of our members sharing their opinion on the importance of voting.

Celebrate!

Our Community Action Teams (CAT) have done diligent nonpartisan voter registration and GOTV work across the country.  Here are some photos from our CAT in Greenville, Mississippi, who did canvassing in the community and transported the elderly and disabled to the polls for early voting. In the photos above, you will witness a 97-year-old resident getting registered for the first time! We are making history!

CATsvote

 

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LASHONLashon Amado is the National Coordinator of Community Action Teams with Opportunity Youth United. He is an alum of the YouthBuild program in Brockton, MA and is working on his Masters in Nonprofit Management at Northeastern University (Boston, MA). His passion for social justice stems from his experience as a young man growing up in a low-income community where he faced many challenges himself. Lashon feels obligated to give back and help drive change for disadvantaged populations who face similar obstacles and feel they do not have a platform to have their issues heard.

 

Our Response to Charlottesville

 

Our Response to Charlottesville

By: The National Council of Young Leaders, Opportunity Youth United
Sep. 8, 2017

September 8, 2017
OYUnited E-Newsletter (Subscribe)

Introduction:

We recognize and are deeply moved by the profound tragedies of hurricanes Harvey and Irma, and the frightening announcement on the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. The internal process of our Council’s reflections takes more time than the rapid cycle of tragedies in the news. We believe our collective response to the events in Charlottesville,Virginia, remains important to share with the members of Opportunity Youth United.

Our Response to Charlottesville:

“You don’t fight racism with racism; you fight it with solidarity.”  (Fred Hampton)

Cville
The National Council of Young Leaders organized Opportunity Youth United in 2015 in order to mobilize Black, White, Native American, Latino/a, Asian, and mixed heritage young leaders of all religious faiths, genders, and sexual identities, from urban and rural communities. We come together and speak from the heart to pinpoint the problems. We envision a society with caring communities, opportunity and responsibility, love and justice, for all.

The ideologies of hate behind the white supremacist, white nationalist, and neo-Nazi groups who descended on Charlottesville are heart-breaking and horrifying to us. All of our elected officials including the President must be held accountable to speak out and join forces to end hate crimes, racism, anti-Semitism, and domestic terrorism.

We know the desire to belong to a caring community and to serve others is part of human nature. Only when people have been profoundly misinformed and hurt do they grow up to hate and harm others.

Physical violence flowing from the hate of white nationalists in Charlottesville resulted in injuries of 19 innocent people and the horrible murder through a deliberate car crash hitting the gentle and devoted Heather Heyer who was known for her deep caring for other human beings. We honor her.

We also honor and learn from our ancestors who stood up bravely giving their lives to fight injustice. “Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.” (Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.) James Reeb, the white Minister killed by white men with clubs for his support of African American civil rights in Selma in 1965, died in solidarity with black activists as did Heather Heyer, whose last Facebook post said, “If you’re not outraged you’re not paying attention.”

We never again want to see the sin of genocide committed against any group of people. Now is the moment for all Americans to stand in solidarity against hate in all forms. We urge all our members to act in your own communities. It is also a moment to keep each other safe from harm. The Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) published an excellent guide for individual and community response to hate, Ten Ways to Fight Hate: A Community Response Guide. This guide includes good advice about preserving your safety while taking visible action.

Opportunity Youth United is mobilizing young adults of all backgrounds who have lived through poverty, and their allies of all ages, to build the power to dramatically decrease poverty and increase opportunity. In 2014, only 11% of eligible 18 to 29 year old voters actually voted! Those who didn’t vote gave away their power. In various localities our Community Action Teams are driving campaigns focused on voter engagement (registration, education, and turnout), criminal justice reform, and access to employment. We want to get the issues of poverty and injustice as they affect all races onto the political agenda everywhere.

Get ready for National Voter Registration Day on September 26th!  We will be mobilizing all our members.  Go tell a friend to tell a friend to join you as a member of OYU at oyunited.org!

In solidarity,
Kimberly Pham and Jamiel Alexander
for the National Council of Young Leaders, Opportunity Youth United